Holiday houses in San Gimignano & holiday apartments in San Gimignano

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    From GBP 374

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    From GBP 245

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  • ​Florence | Holiday with the Medici
    From GBP 425

  • Tuscany | ​Holiday with your own pool
    From GBP 374

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The best chocolate ice on the globe

Siena Province | Siena is situated in the heart of Tuscany. The student town in gothic style is surrounded by three hills. Go on a walk through the winding and steep lanes, be enthralled by the delightful architecture of the Gothic period and watch street artists perform amusing acts. The stroll through the city then passes on to the Piazza del Campo which is a shell shaped plaza in the centre and where numerous inviting cafés and restaurants are located. Alternatively sit on one of the cobble stones and enjoy the going-on. On the 2nd of July and 16th of August every year the famous horse race Palio di Siena takes place around this place.

Past the yellow broom and rape the streets of Tuscany lead to San Gimignano which can be seen from far away due to its characteristic towers. What is regarded as the Manhattan of the Medieval period you can climb up the Torre Grosse. The dizzy ascent via the transparent steps is very much worth it considering the spectacular view. Afterwards refresh yourself at the Piazza with a cool drink or “gelato” (ice cream). Insider tip: In San Gimifnano there is a small gelateria that has received the award of having the best chocolate ice cream in the world. Honestly it is just a dream!

Reviews from our customers

4.4 out of 5 (89 Customer reviews)
1 The holiday homes and apartments in in San Gimignano have been rated by 89 customers, scoring 4.4 out of 5 houses, on average.

Location reviews

Total rating of San Gimignano

4.5 out of 5 (167 Customer reviews)
Rate this location

This is what holiday rental customers wrote about San Gimignano 

  • 5.0 out of 5
    atraveo customer Ulf wrote
    on 20/05/2016 in German, travel period: May 2016

    “San Gimignano muss man gesehen haben.”

    This review has been given for property no. 628078

  • 4.0 out of 5
    An atraveo-customer has submitted the following rating
    on 12/05/2016, travel period: April 2016

    less recommended

    This review has been given for property no. 389655

  • 5.0 out of 5
    An atraveo-customer wrote
    on 08/04/2016, travel period: March 2016

    “San Gimignano offers a lot and is good starting point for trips into the surrounding area.”

    This review has been given for property no. 276805 The review of the area has been automatically translated from German. Back to the original language

  • 4.0 out of 5
    An atraveo-customer wrote
    on 04/04/2016, travel period: March 2016

    “Gastronomy is touristy and expensive. This was clear at the place.”

    This review has been given for property no. 276805 The review of the area has been automatically translated from German. Back to the original language

  • 5.0 out of 5
    An atraveo-customer wrote
    on 30/03/2016

    “Purchases easily and extensively possible. Optimal for access to all places in Tuscany that are worth. Trips to the sea also feasible and easy to connect with stopover eg in Volterra.”

    This review has been given for property no. 843556 The review of the area has been automatically translated from German. Back to the original language


This is how holiday rental owners described San Gimignano

The "Historic Center of San Gimignano" is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
source: Zambon
San Gimignano is a small walled medieval hill town in the province of Siena, Tuscany, north-central Italy. It is mainly famous for its medieval architecture, especially its towers, which may be seen from several kilometres outside the town.
The town also is known for the white wine, Vernaccia di San ...
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Gimignano, grown in the area.

San Gimignano was founded as a small village in the 3rd century BC by the Etruscans. Historical records begin in the 10th century, when it adopted the name of the bishop Saint Geminianus, who had defended it from Attila's Huns.
In the Middle Ages and Renaissance era, it was a stopping point for Catholic pilgrims on their way to Rome and the Vatican, as it sits on the medieval Via Francigena. The city's development also was improved by the trade of agricultural products from the fertile neighbouring hills.
In 1199, during the period of its highest splendour, the city made itself independent from the bishops of Volterra. Divisions between Guelphs and Ghibellines troubled the inner life of the commune, which nonetheless, still managed to embellish itself with artworks and architectures.
Saint Fina, known also as Seraphina and Serafina, was a 13th century Italian saint born in San Gimignano during 1238. Since Saint Fina died on March 12, 1253 her feast day became March 12. Her major shrine is in San Gimignano and the house said to be her home still stands in the town.
On May 8, 1300, San Gimignano hosted Dante Alighieri in his role of ambassador of the Guelph League in Tuscany.[citation needed]
The city flourished until 1348, when the Black Death that affected all of Europe, compelled it to submit to Florence. San Gimignano became a secondary centre until the 19th century, when its status as a touristic and artistic resort began to be recognised.


While in other cities, such as Bologna or Florence, most or all of their towers have been brought down due to wars, catastrophes, or urban renewal, San Gimignano has managed to conserve fourteen towers of varying height which have become its international symbol.
There are many churches in the town: the two main ones are the Collegiata, formerly a cathedral, and Sant'Agostino, housing a wide representation of artworks from some of the main Italian renaissance artists.
The Communal Palace, once seat of the podestà, is currently home of the town gallery, with works by Pinturicchio, Benozzo Gozzoli, Filippino Lippi, Domenico di Michelino, Pier Francesco Fiorentino and others. From Dante's Hall in the palace, access may be made to a Majesty fresco by Lippo Memmi, as well as the Torre del Podestà or Torre Grossa, 1311, which stands fifty-four metres high.
The heart of the town contains the four squares, the Piazza della Cisterna, the Piazza Duomo where the Collegiata is located, the Piazza Pecori and the Piazza delle Erbe. The main streets are Via San Matteo and Via San Giovanni, which cross the city from north to south.


San Gimignano is the birthplace of the poet Folgore da San Gimignano (1270–1332).
A fictionalised version of San Gimignano is featured in E. M. Forster's 1905 novel, Where Angels Fear to Tread as Monteriano.
Tea with Mussolini, a 1999 drama about the plight of English and American expatriate women in Italy during World War II, was filmed in part at San Gimignano. The the main actresses Maggie Smith, Judi Dench, Lilly Tomlin have stayed for the duration of the shoot at Il Coltro. The frescoes that the women save from being destroyed during the German Army's withdrawal are inside the Duomo, the town's main church.
In the novel The Broker by John Grisham, Joel Backman takes his second of three wives on vacation in Italy to keep her from divorcing him. They rent a 14th century monastery near San Gimignano for a month.
M. C. Escher's 1923 woodcut, San Gimignano, depicts the celebrated towers.
15th century San Gimignano may be explored in the video game Assassin's Creed II.
Located in the heart of the city, the museum San Gimignano 1300 offers a massive reconstruction of the city as it existed 700 years ago. Architects, historians, and a team of artists worked nearly 3 years to create this spectacular and unprecedented exhibition. This exhibit includes 800 meticulously handcrafted structures, 72 towers, street scenes, and figurines.
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source: Baldi
San Gimignano rises on a hill (334m high) dominating the Elsa Valley with its towers. Once the seat of a small Etruscan village of the Hellenistic period (200-300 BC) it began its life as a town in the 10th century taking its name from the Holy Bishop of Modena, St. ...
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Gimignano, who is said to have saved the village from the barbarian hordes. The town increased in wealth and developed greatly during the Middle Ages thanks to the "Via Francigena" the trading and pilgrim's route that crossed it. Such prosperity lead to the flourishing of works of art to adorn the churches and monasteries. In 1199 it became a free municipality and fought against the Bishops of Volterra and the surrounding municipalities. Due to internal power struggles it eventually divided into two factions one headed by the Ardinghelli family (Guelphs) and the other by the Salvucci family (Ghibellines). On the 8th May 1300 Dante Alighieri came to San Gimignano as the Ambassador of the Guelph League in Tuscany. In 1348 San Gimignano's population was drastically reduced by the Black Death Plague throwing the city into a serious crisis which eventually led to its submission to Florence in 1353. In the following centuries San Gimignano overcame its decline and isolation when its beauty and cultural importance together with its agricultural heritage were rediscovered. The construction of the towers dates back to the 11th and 13th centuries. The architecture of the city was influenced by Pisa, Siena and Florence. There are 14th century paintings of the Sienese School to be seen and 15th century paintings of the Florentine School.
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source: Soc. Coop Poggio alle Fonti

Photos of the town

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